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Will this woman be richer in Heaven than here on Earth?
There is a 30 something woman from Germany who lives in a mansion and she owns a newer model Porsche, a newer model BMW and a newer model Mercedes Benz and she also gets to own hundreds of leather jackets, leather dresses, leather coats, leather gloves, leather pants, leather skirts and leather boots and she also has a lot of nice furniture, nice stereo equipment and jewelry.

I'm not sure what her religious status is but I would love for her to be much richer in Heaven than here on Earth, I do believe that Jesus Christ is God the Son, has died on the cross for our sins and is our Lord and Saviour and the only way to Heaven
THERE IS NO HEAVEN
Need outfit advice for these black leather over the knee Guess dress boots?
I need some recommendations for these over the knee boots by Guess (Model: Rumala) in Black Leather.
img264.imageshack.us/i/rumala.jpg/

I bought these Guess over the knee boots. Can you suggest a conservative office/day wear look for 1 dress and 1 skirt with top (any color, any length)? Please post any online links to clothes.
if you are looking for a smart dress that won't bust the bank:

www.newlook.co.uk/1751115/1751115… or:

www.newlook.co.uk/1792802/1792802… add a bit of colour with this dress:

www.newlook.co.uk/1746392/1746392… new look is a very good website.

with all the dresses you can where opaque or slightly opaque tights.

you could wear a skirt:

www.newlook.co.uk/1778325/1778325… << fab with this:

www.newlook.co.uk/1823807/1823807… or any white frilled shirt

hope you get something from that
Sex sell girls short? -what do you think?
WASHINGTON (National Catholic Register) – Products such as Bratz dolls clad in leather mini-skirts abound on the market for girls under age 10. Teen magazines and television shows promote underdressed celebrities such as Paris Hilton and Brittney Spears as role models. A porn actress writes a best-selling autobiography, and pre-teen girls show up at her book signings.

Advertisement

Parents have long expressed concern that their daughters are being “sexualized” by merchandise and mass media.

Sex sells, and it is increasingly being used to market clothing, toys and entertainment to young girls.

But is society selling these girls short? What are the long-term implications of teaching a guy that she must look and behave like a sexual object to be fashionable or popular?

The American Psychological Association addressed the issue in a recent study. It formed a task force to define sexualization, examine its prevalence and provide examples in society and in cultural institutions. The task force also set out to evaluate the evidence suggesting that sexualization has negative consequences for girls and for society. It described positive alternatives to help counteract it.

The report, published Feb. 19, defined sexualization as something “occurring when a person’s value comes only from his or her sexual appeal or behavior, to the exclusion of other characteristics, and when a person is sexually objectified.” Results showed that every media form contributed to the sexualization of girls and young women by portraying them in a sexual manner more often than boys and men.

Task force member Sharon Lamb, co-author of “Packaging Girlhood: Rescuing Our Daughters From Marketers’ Schemes,” said marketers play a significant role in sexualizing girls. “They are reaching down to younger and younger girls, selling a version of what it means to be a teenager,” she said. “According to them it is all about being hot and sexy.”

The task force also found that parents, teachers and peers may also contribute to the sexualization by conveying the message that physical appearance is the most important goal for a girl. The study went on to suggest that girls may also play a part in sexualizing themselves by wearing clothing to make them look “sexy,” thus viewing themselves as sexual objects.

Damaging

The American Psychological Association’s report concluded that sexualization was damaging to all women, but particularly to younger girls who are still forming a sense of self. Negative effects include increased risks of depression, eating disorders and low self-esteem. It also discussed the negative impact the sexualization of girls can have on society as a whole as it affects other groups, including men and boys.

Catholic psychiatrist Richard Fitzgibbons sees narcissism in our culture with the worship of the body. He points to media outlets such as MySpace and YouTube.

“These Internet programs contribute to a person believing their identity is determined by their body,” he said. “A girl typically puts pictures of herself online to get attention and comments from others. Some girls get so caught up in the Internet culture, their own self-worth is measured by how their Internet ‘friends’ view their physical appearance.”

Citing John Paul II’s 1994 “Letter to Families,” Fitzgibbons explained that permissive parenting can cause a girl to succumb to sexualization. “Girls are at risk when parents fail to correct selfishness, form modesty and monitor friendships,” he said.

The task force recommends educating parents on the dangers of sexualizing girls and urges them to become more involved in viewing media with their guyren. The task force also encouraged organized groups to step up and confront the issue by offering girls “practical and psychological alternatives to the values conveyed by popular culture.”

“If marketers and the media assume more of a social conscience, this sexualization of girls can be prevented,” said Lamb. “Parent protests and support of watchdog groups are also important.”

Joseph D’Agostino of the Population Research Institute, a non-profit research and educational organization, asserts that the American Psychological Association’s report stops short by failing to mention the sexualization of girls as a result of the feminist movement. In a weekly briefing, he wrote, “The politically correct view is that the sexualization of girls and feminism are opposing forces, but in fact they have gone hand-in-hand.”

D’Agostino attested that feminism teaches girls that chastity oppresses them and a girl must liberate herself sexually to be equal with men.

“They have taught that there are no natural limits to sexuality,” he wrote. “Based on feminist principles, why shouldn’t little girls sexualize themselves? And why shouldn’t adult men and women view them as sexual if there is no such thing as unnatural sexuality?”

Fitzgibbons said parents must “grow in wisdom as authoritative parents.” He also encouraged priests and Catholic educators to “communicate the truth about sexual morality and warn of the dangers of the sexual utilitarian philosophy and the contraceptive mentality.”

Reaching Out

Fitzgibbons recommends reading John Paul II’s 1994 Letter to Families and his 1981 Apostolic Exhortation, “Familiaris Consortio” (“The Role of the Christian Family in the Modern World”), as well as teaching guyren the truth about human sexuality.

“An excellent resource is Theology of the Body for Teens by Jason Evert, Brian Butler, Mark Hart and Crystalina Evert from Ascension Press,” he said.

Catholic groups have recognized this crisis and are reaching out to young women. Pure Fashion, an organization that helps women ages 14-18 “embrace their authentic beauty and innate dignity as guyren of God, focuses on guiding young women to live the virtues of modesty and purity in their schools and communities.”

According to Rhonda Boyle, Pure Fashion’s national assistant, the program is designed to combat the sexualization of girls through fashion.

“We are working hard,” she said, “to change our culture by creating role models who will live a life of purity and modesty in fashion in their schools, churches and communities.”

- - -

Bethany Noble, based in Phoenix, Ariz., is a correspondent for National Catholic Register.

- - -

Copyright © 2007 Circle Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Republished with permission by Catholic Online from the Aug. 26 - Sept. 1, 2007, National Catholic Register (www.ncregister.com), a Catholic Online Preferred Publishing Partner.
the religious leaders controlled us in the past, all that sexual oppression was to keep us from having orgies and impregnating each others wives.

want to know what i think? Western civ. has peaked and just like the islamic, roman, and greek empires we are experimenting with gender roles and sexuality before we fall.

its a "players" world now.

last days of rome, make hay!
What's a way to look unique/cute in standardized dress?
I'll be a junior in high school this year.

Our school just voted for Standardized Dress (bleh!) and here's what we have to wear:

Pants: Must be slacks or worker style pants. Colors are black, navy blue, khaki.
Shorts/skirts: Must reach on or below the knee. Colors are black, navy blue, khaki.

Shirts: Any SOLID color dress or polo-style shirt ... collar is mandatory. Logo cannot be larger than a credit card. Must be tucked in.

Shoes: Closed toe and heel, solid color, must be leather like or canvas, loafer type, boots, or tennis shoes. (Only white, brown, black, and navy blue)

- - - -

I'm not model-thin, but I am definitely not fat. I want to look cute, but not show-off-y. What are earrings I can wear, or styles to do my hair? Suggestions for jewelry? What type of shirts and pants look good together? What about brands?

Any suggestions you can give, I would be MORE than happy to accept them!!

Thank you so much! =)
OK you should definately wear your hair up because if it's down it will look like your hair is kind flowing into your outfit. Do like a swept up do. Dont' go over board with earrings simply dangles or studs are cute. You should also wear a unique long necklace that has colors that express you. With the pants you can go with khakis and a pink, yellow, or bold color shirt so you can stand out. Try fiding lacrose shirts that have millions of colors. I have over 25 lacrose shirts in all different colors, they are cute and stylish. Try some cute heel boots, or cute canvas shoes.
Is this character a mary-sue?
Here are the posts between me and another rp'er. I got a wee bit annoyed by her posts? Is this a potential mary-sue? Or am I just paranoid?

"me- Catethena Valentino sat against the cold, grey walls of the auditorium room in the Watchtower up in Space for the Justice League. Her guitar leaned against the wall next to her. She looked around. While there were a few others who had similar style in clothing like her, it didn't take her long to notice that her clothes at the least would make her stand out.

She decided to watch everybody, see what who was like.

othergirl- Two girls walked into the auditorium and looked around for a moment before walking over to lean against a wall. They could see everyone who came into the room and almost everyone in the room from where they stood, which made them just lean back and relax while watching and waiting.

me- Catethena looked up when she saw two more girls walk in, but than looked back down. She was tapping on her knee, her dark pink and black hair covering her face.

othergirl- The blonde looked around the room, her lavender/violet gaze scanning the people who were there. Her gaze stopped on a girl withpink and black hair and she elbowed the brown haired girl, motioning toward the girl with a jerk of her head. The other girl studied the girl with her sapphire eyes for a moment before looking at the other girl. The blonde shook her head with a sigh, careful not to mess up her fancy braided hair-do. The brown haired girl sighed and nodded once, her own hair just pulled back in a simple ponytail. The two girls straightened and headed toward the pink/ black haired girl.

me- The pink/black haired girl -Catethena- was tapping on her knees. She wore mostly black and pink clothes, save the piercing on her bellybutton which was a music symbol, purple shoes, and the yellow smiley face necklace. She hummed a tune to herself, watching those in the room. After a while, she started to stare at the ground, imagining little people dancing. (I want to say originally in that post, I had described her outfit, such as that it was black with pink striped pants, a pink skull and hearts shirt, and pink and black bracelets. But I edited it because I messed up in spelling)

othergirl- The blonde girl and brown haired girl stopped a yard away from the girl, studying her for a moment. The blonde wore a dark violet metallic halter top that showed off her stomach, tight, metallic black leggings with a short white leather skirt over them, and white leather boots. She wore make-up, just enough to make her appear older and made her look like a model or superstar, and her hair was done up in a fancy braided hair-do that she had made up herself. She wore a pair of silver hoop earrings and a intricately designed golden locket on a golden chain around her neck. The other girl wore a pair of dark blue designer jeans, a skin tight sapphire blue shimmery shirt with silver sequins in the shape of a lightning bolt across her back. Her hair was plaited into a single braid and she wore no make-up, since she didn't need to wear any.

me- Catethena didn't care for her looks much. She wore what she herself found pretty, but had noticed it made her stand out. Sometimes in good ways, sometimes in bad. It always depended. She wore colours she liked, colours that matched her art. And art was the important thing to her. Coming from a family of artists and musicians, she was extremely talented in the subject. That, and her powers revolved around it.

Her old, beat up guitar leaned against the wall next to her. She didn't seem to notice, or pay attention to the two girls."

Here are two paragraphs from her characters powers/abilities section.
Blond haired girl- She is super good horse back rider and has won numerous ribbons and trophies. Though, she never brags about it. She is also a great singer, though she keeps that a huge secret. Her power is that she can control the weather... Mostly. She doesn't have a good grip on controling it yet, but she's trying.

Brown haired girl- She can control Nature's natural disasters. Thus, that's why she's nicknamed 'Storm'. Though, when her anger gets out of hand, so does her power. She is also a great artist and her drawings are almost lifelike. She also loves nature and loves to horseback ride with Izzy.

Now, I would like it known my character Catethena comes from a family of musicians/artists, and that's where her powers are. Naturally -actually, through hard work- she is very talented in the subject. I think I'm partially worried that this other person is trying to be more talented in that subject than Cat, though her characters have had nothing to do with it in past or powers.
It's hard to tell, even from the detailed RP you have here, whether the other person is indeed trying to one-up your character. I think that if you're very worried about it, or if it really bothers you, you should (respectfully) take it up with the other RP'er. It could be just a misunderstanding or accident; then again, it could be that the other person is truly trying to upstage your character. As I said, it's hard for me to say from just this small piece of the RP.
Where can I find fashion ideas?
I am a 24 year old girl that does not have intrinsic fashion sense. I would like to see models wearing fashion ideas. They do not have to be the latest--in fact I do not like most of the ideas at Macy's or Dillards this year! I sorta like what was out last year, but I never went shopping. I don't know...Can anyone point me in the right direction? I like leggings (I have leather and normal), boots, skirts, jackets, and fashionable tops. I also like accessories, like scarves or jewelry. Can anyone give me an idea where I can see models put them together? Thanks, please! :)
www.ninemsn.com/dolly
www.ninemsn.com/cleo
www.style.com

Um, maybe go into like a really high end department store and pick up ideas? Try Magazines such as Vogue?
Do you like what I'm writing?
Her hair was blonde, vaguely white. Her skin was pale— an oddity being that she lived in central Texas. She had long thin legs; her many admirers likened to them to Bambi’s first few moments on the ice—awkward. She looked like one of those starving, coked out models toward the end of their careers.

Her name was Ida, just Ida. She had a last name, but everyone forgets. I remembered she once joked, “It was easier for adoring fans to scream Ida than Idina Santamaria.” But Ida was not a pop star or model. Ida was an 18 year-old college student, and now, a famous one at that, for she had committed suicide by hanging in her dorm room the week earlier. Everyone on campus whispered her name, all the news stations flashed her picture and an obituary was bought by the school to commemorate the loss. However, none of news coverage could properly describe the sum of her life: Ida was beautiful.

“I saw her from the university’s café on the first day of school,” I said.
She rushed, probably to her first class, in short bouncy steps. Her leather knee length skirt was tight, which caused her to take the small steps but it still didn’t account for the cartoonish gait—that was all Ida. Her shoulders were pushed back and her chest pushed forward when she turned to face the group of people in the café. I was unsure if she noticed the unsaid gasp on people’s faces. At the time, I would be surprised if she saw anything: her dark glasses hid most of her face and perhaps it was kinder to believe that was true. The small crowd was not shocked for any polite reason. We thought she looked ridiculous.

“…and what did you think, Paul?” Dr. Charles Powell said.

“I thought she looked…wonderful,” I said. “Strange, but wonderful,”

Ida was not strange in individual parts. The red lipstick, the pink cardigan, the leopard heels, and the perfectly coiffed Monroe hair were all fine, albeit tacky, in small doses. But combined? Well, she must have known she would turn heads.

Charlie—I called him Charlie because I knew he hated it—laughed.

“What was so strange about her?” he said.

“Well, she dressed different. She acted different. She sort of had this attitude that just pissed people off, and trust me; she pissed a whole lot of people off here on campus.”

And I think that was Ida’s whole shtick. She never said so and she never responded seriously to questions about it, but I knew she did this—the clothes, the attitude, the walk— for show. I didn’t hate her like some of the people who said Ida was a fake. She was a fake. She was a fraud, an impostor, a lie. But she lived everyday to live up to that lie.

“Well, time is about up, Paul. I want you to schedule an appointment with my secretary for some time next week. If there are any problem, feel free to call me or drop by the office,” he said. “Any other questions before we leave?”

“No, I’m good.”

When I left, the sun was setting and the evening was unusually arid. It reminded me of home. Unfortunately, there was no time to pine as I was meeting my two best friends: Tiffany and David. To tell the truth, they were my best friends by default being that they were my only friends. However, I liked them plenty to let them keep their respective titles. We were going to be talking about Ida. In fact, all conversation for the past few weeks seemed to be dominated by her. Even in death, she was endlessly fascinating. Not to minimize the loss—we were all devastated to hear the news—but our collective mourning was short lived as the mystery of why Ida killed herself became center news. And to be honest, we were impressed with the way she, as they say, left the building. Tiffany was brave enough to admit “only Ida can have a biography where her death isn’t the last chapter.”
When I climbed up the bleaches, I found Tiff and Dave leaning into each other whispering. I had to stop myself from pointing out the whispers were unnecessary—there was no one around. But since she had died, they had insisted on whispering when we talked about Ida.

I remember watching movies where one character seems to be moving in slow motion and every poor shlub would stare with their mouths open. They would think that every head shake or glance was done for their benefit, but the audience knew better. It was strange then, to have found myself a part of this phenomenon at the Café shop when I first saw Ida. Yes, we were all nonplussed by the outlandish costume and the silly walk, but we soon found ourselves staring for other reasons. Granted, Ida wasn’t in slow motion, but she was slow enough. However, I think Tiffany and David never grew out of their “slow motion phase.” Whereas, I recognized how ridiculous the situation and Ida were, they refused to be nothing but loyal. This made it difficult to discuss the reasons why she might have committed suicide as they refused to listen to any attacks on her character.

“What are you guys talking about” I asked.

David was tall, but awkwardl
I love it so much detail and it's sad but pretty:)

EDIT: When it becomes published you should totaly tell us the title so I can get this. It's something I'd definitely read and a lot of my friends would too:)
Do you like what I am writing so far?
Her hair was blonde, vaguely white; her skin pale— an oddity being that she lived in central Texas. She had long thin legs; her many admirers likened to them to Bambi’s first few moments on the ice—awkward. She looked like one of those starving, coked out models toward the end of their careers.

Her name was Ida, just Ida. She had a last name, but everyone always forgets. I remembered she once joked, “It was easier for adoring fans to scream Ida than Idina Santamaria.” But Ida was not a pop star or model. Ida was an 18 year-old college student, and now, a famous one at that, for she had committed suicide by hanging in her dorm room the week earlier. Everyone on campus whispered her name, all the news stations flashed her picture and an obituary was bought by the school to commemorate the loss. However, none of news coverage could properly describe the sum of her life: Ida was beautiful.

“I saw her from the university’s café on the first day of school,” I said.

She rushed, probably to her first class, in short bouncy steps. Her leather knee length skirt was tight, which caused her to take the small steps, but it still didn’t account for the cartoonish gait—that was all Ida. Her shoulders were pushed back and her chest pushed forward when she turned to face the group of people in the café. I was unsure if she noticed the unsaid gasp on people’s faces. At the time, I would be surprised if she saw anything: her dark glasses hid most of her face and perhaps it was kinder to believe that was true; the small crowd was not shocked for any polite reason. We thought she looked ridiculous.

“…and what did you think, Paul?” Dr. Charles Powell said.

“I thought she looked…wonderful,” I said. “Strange, but wonderful,”

Ida was not strange in individual parts. The red lipstick, the pink cardigan, the leopard heels, and the perfectly quaffed Monroe hair were all fine, albeit tacky, in small doses. But combined? Well, she must have known she would turn heads.

Charlie—I called him Charlie because I knew he hated it—laughed.

“What was so strange about her?” he said.

“Well, she dressed different. She acted different. She sort of had this attitude that just pissed people off, and trust me; she pissed a whole lot of people off here on campus,”

And I think that was Ida’s whole shtick. She never said so and she never responded seriously to questions about it, but I knew she did this—the clothes, the attitude, the walk— for show. I didn’t hate her though like some of the people who said Ida was a fake. She was a fake. She was a fraud, an impostor, a lie. But she lived everyday to live up to that lie.
One thing i have to add is that the use of semi colons in a fiction novel is so unecessary that it is annoying. Take them out and replace them with commas or periods.

I really enjoyed this. you have a great writing style, and its easy to udnerstand. Your plot is amazing. Dont stop with this, you have a good novel ahead of you.



Please critique my book?
answers.yahoo.com/question/index;…




EDIT:

Because when you are writing fiction, you need to take everything you learned about grammar and THROW IT OUT THE WINDOW. With fiction the writing style is a lot different. Sentences dont always have to make sense. One sentence is one thought. It could be "Wow." Now technically, that isnt a grammatically correct sentence, but it is in a novel. Semi colons are a sore to the eye. If you want a choppy, straight to the point writing style like hemingway then i suggest replacing a lot of your commas and semi colons with straight periods. In a novel it still makes sense this way, and it eliminated extra uneeded baggage while still getting the same point across.

If you want long, elaborate, victorian like sentences like shakespeare, then replace those semi colons with commas, and add all the baggage you want. The only problem with this, is it eliminates a group of people willing to read your book because its harder.

either way, semi colons are all around horrible. In fact, im not entirely sure how to even describe why exactly.
What do you think of my writing?
Her hair was blonde, vaguely white. Her skin was pale— an oddity being that she lived in central Texas. She had long thin legs; her many admirers likened to them to Bambi’s first few moments on the ice—awkward. She looked like one of those starving, coked out models toward the end of their careers.

Her name was Ida, just Ida. She had a last name, but everyone forgets. I remembered she once joked, “It was easier for adoring fans to scream Ida than Idina Santamaria.” But Ida was not a pop star or model. Ida was an 18 year-old college student, and now, a famous one at that, for she had committed suicide by hanging in her dorm room the week earlier. Everyone on campus whispered her name, all the news stations flashed her picture and an obituary was bought by the school to commemorate the loss. However, none of news coverage could properly describe the sum of her life: Ida was beautiful.

“I saw her from the university’s café on the first day of school,” I said.

She rushed, probably to her first class, in short bouncy steps. Her leather knee length skirt was tight, which caused her to take the small steps but it still didn’t account for the cartoonish gait—that was all Ida. Her shoulders were pushed back and her chest pushed forward when she turned to face the group of people in the café. I was unsure if she noticed the unsaid gasp on people’s faces. At the time, I would be surprised if she saw anything: her dark glasses hid most of her face and perhaps it was kinder to believe that was true. The small crowd was not shocked for any polite reason. We thought she looked ridiculous.

“…and what did you think, Paul?” Dr. Charles Powell said.

“I thought she looked…wonderful,” I said. “Strange, but wonderful,”

Ida was not strange in individual parts. The red lipstick, the pink cardigan, the leopard heels, and the perfectly coiffed Monroe hair were all fine, albeit tacky, in small doses. But combined? Well, she must have known she would turn heads.

Charlie—I called him Charlie because I knew he hated it—laughed.

“What was so strange about her?” he said.

“Well, she dressed different. She acted different. She sort of had this attitude that just pissed people off, and trust me; she pissed a whole lot of people off here on campus.”

And I think that was Ida’s whole shtick. She never said so and she never responded seriously to questions about it, but I knew she did this—the clothes, the attitude, the walk— for show. I didn’t hate her like some of the people who said Ida was a fake. She was a fake. She was a fraud, an impostor, a lie. But she lived everyday to live up to that lie.
Not bad, Jaime. Really, not bad.

You have a style and an interesting way of composing sentences; you are one of the few 'writers' on here I would estimate as over 20 years old with a burgeoning talent.

I wonder if maybe your description of Ida was influenced a bit by Nabakov's Lolita? There's a little bit of "Lola in one sock... Dolores on the dotted line" in the way you tie her name to that giraffe-like gait of her.

I like the beginnings of intrigue - she committed suicide. Why? How?

I like that your beautiful object of mystery is a bit ridiculous, too-aware of her beauty, too over-the-top. It makes her more realistic. You're not bowing down to her beauty as so many authors would.

I especially like:
"still didn’t account for the cartoonish gait—that was all Ida."

"Ida was not strange in individual parts. The red lipstick, the pink cardigan, the leopard heels, and the perfectly coiffed Monroe hair were all fine, albeit tacky, in small doses."

Beautifully done!

But your writing still needs some massaging. I didn't care for:

"...an oddity being that she lived in central Texas." (The whole first half of the paragraph - a bit awkward for an opening - my initial reaction was "oh god, another beauty-worshiper with no substance" until I read further.)

"However, none of news coverage could properly describe the sum of her life: Ida was beautiful." (Ditto! Please, you've got something good here - don't summarize her down to being a "beautiful girl" - give her her insecurities and ego - she deserves them!)

Overall, I'm really quite impressed. Good luck with your writing!

Michelle
.
Has anyone ever had anything published? And if so, what do u think of my developing novel?
Her hair was blonde, vaguely white. Her skin was pale— an oddity being that she lived in central Texas. She had long thin legs; her many admirers likened to them to Bambi’s first few moments on the ice—awkward. She looked like one of those starving, coked out models toward the end of their careers.

Her name was Ida, just Ida. She had a last name, but everyone forgets. I remembered she once joked, “It was easier for adoring fans to scream Ida than Idina Santamaria.” But Ida was not a pop star or model. Ida was an 18 year-old college student, and now, a famous one at that, for she had committed suicide by hanging in her dorm room the week earlier. Everyone on campus whispered her name, all the news stations flashed her picture and an obituary was bought by the school to commemorate the loss. However, none of news coverage could properly describe the sum of her life: Ida was beautiful.

“I saw her from the university’s café on the first day of school,” I said.

She rushed, probably to her first class, in short bouncy steps. Her leather knee length skirt was tight, which caused her to take the small steps but it still didn’t account for the cartoonish gait—that was all Ida. Her shoulders were pushed back and her chest pushed forward when she turned to face the group of people in the café. I was unsure if she noticed the unsaid gasp on people’s faces. At the time, I would be surprised if she saw anything: her dark glasses hid most of her face and perhaps it was kinder to believe that was true. The small crowd was not shocked for any polite reason. We thought she looked ridiculous.

“…and what did you think, Paul?” Dr. Charles Powell said.

“I thought she looked…wonderful,” I said. “Strange, but wonderful,”

Ida was not strange in individual parts. The red lipstick, the pink cardigan, the leopard heels, and the perfectly coiffed Monroe hair were all fine, albeit tacky, in small doses. But combined? Well, she must have known she would turn heads.

Charlie—I called him Charlie because I knew he hated it—laughed.

“What was so strange about her?” he said.

“Well, she dressed different. She acted different. She sort of had this attitude that just pissed people off, and trust me; she pissed a whole lot of people off here on campus.”

And I think that was Ida’s whole shtick. She never said so and she never responded seriously to questions about it, but I knew she did this—the clothes, the attitude, the walk— for show. I didn’t hate her like some of the people who said Ida was a fake. She was a fake. She was a fraud, an impostor, a lie. But she lived everyday to live up to that lie.
This is one of the most well-written pieces I have read on YA, and it certainly has the potential to be very good.

A few minor things I might change:
1. Remove the comma in "and now, a famous one at that" ?
2. Add comma after "caused her to take the small steps" ?
3. "noticed the unsaid gasp on people's faces" sounds a bit strange, can you notice something unsaid? And "unsaid" implies sound, whereas "on people's faces" implies vision.
4. "shocked for any polite reason" also, not sure you can be shocked for a polite reason?
5. Last sentence, split "everyday" into "every day". Maybe find a synonym to replace one of the "live" , they're repeated close together?

The writing style works well and I found this engaging. It's good stuff, I'd definitely like to read more.

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